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Clip vs Drop point blade style explanation.

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deadreign

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Clip vs Drop point blade style explanation. - Sunday, July 12, 2009 10:57 AM ( #1 )
Hey guys, I thought I had a firm grip on blade styles, but I saw a knife advertised as a drop point which I would've called a clip point.
So to clarify, is it a clip point only if the area from the end of the spine to the point is concave?
 
Thanks in advance.
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Grendelking

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Re:Clip vs Drop point blade style explanation. - Sunday, July 12, 2009 2:53 PM ( #2 )
Clip point is the other most common blade shape used. In a traditional clip point knife the back or dull edge of the knife starts straight from the handle to about one third or one fourth of the blade length. Then it proceeds down straight to the knife's point, which is generally placed clearly below the middle point of the blade's width. In such deep clip designs, the blade's portion that is clipped often has a concave shape, as if someone has taken a bite out of the blade. In such cases the design leaves the tip narrow and comparatively weaker. As a result the clip point knife tip cannot be abused and it is not as usable compared to drop point design for survival situations. Recent designs of clip point blades come up with relative short and straight clip in a robust blade which ends up similar to a drop point design.

Among the most popular kinds of blade shapes, a drop point shaped blade is the most versatile of them all. In this design, the dull edge of the knife blade goes straight for about half the length towards the tip starting from the knife handle. Then the edge slopes gently downwards like the hood design of a well designed sports car. At the meeting point of the edges, the sharpened edge curves upward and meets the back edge of the blade, forming a point which will be slightly higher than the center of the blade's width. This drop is the reason for the name 'Drop point'. This kind of lowered tip results in a strong tip and provides good control of the knife during use. This type pf blade is generally good for all kind of cutting activities and is mainly useful for slicing.

More info here...There's two parts. Pretty interesting.
http://www.knife-making-supplies.net/knife-blade-shapes.html
 
"The rifle is the first weapon you learn how to use,
because it lets you keep your distance from the client.
The closer you get to being a pro,
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deadreign

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Re:Clip vs Drop point blade style explanation. - Sunday, July 12, 2009 5:03 PM ( #3 )
Thanks for the reply Grendelking but I'm still not tracking on this, maybe we can use some CS models as examples.
What is the Pocket Bushman?
The Long Hunter?
I know the really obvious ones, like the Natchez is a clip vs. the Outdoorsman is a drop point.

I did follow that link, but without pics, those descriptions might as well be in Chinese to me.
We've got to break it down to Barney level for me.

Thanks
"Every scar is a victory..."
-Armadillo
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Re:Clip vs Drop point blade style explanation. - Sunday, July 12, 2009 9:09 PM ( #4 )
- [This post was marked as helpful]
Patterns of knife blades
Blade styles with typical edges highlighted.


There are a variety of knife blade shapes; some of the most common are listed below.
(1) A normal blade has a curving edge, and flat back. A dull back lets the wielder use fingers to concentrate force; it also makes the knife heavy and strong for its size. The curve concentrates force on a small point, making cutting easier. This knife can chop as well as pick and slice.
(2) A curved, trailing-point knife has a back edge that curves upward. This lets a lightweight knife have a larger curve on its edge. Such a knife is optimized for slicing or slashing. Trailing point blades provide a larger cutting area, or belly, and are common on skinning knives.

Clip-point blade


(3) A clip-point blade is like a normal blade with the back "clipped" or concavely formed to make the tip thinner and sharper. The back edge of the clip may have a false edge that could be sharpened to make a second edge. The sharp tip is useful as a pick, or for cutting in tight places. If the false edge is sharpened it increases the knife's effectiveness in piercing. The Bowie knife has a clipped blade and clip-points are quite common on pocket knives and other folding knives.

Drop-point blade


(4) A drop point blade has a convex curve of the back towards the point. It handles much like the clip-point, though with a stronger point less suitable for piercing. Swiss army pocket knives often have drop-points on their larger blades.

Spear-point blade


(5) A spear-point blade is a symmetrical blade with a spine that runs along the middle of the blade. The point is in line with the spine. Spear-points may be single-edged (with a false edge) or double-edged or may have only a portion of the second edge sharpened. Pen-knives are often single-edged, non-spined spear-points, usually quite small, named for their past use in sharpening quills for writing. Pen-knife may also nowadays refer to somewhat larger pocket knives which are often drop-points. Some throwing knives may have spear-points but without the spine, being only flat pieces of metal.
(6) A needle-point blade is a symmetrical, highly tapered, twin-edged blade often seen in fighting blades, such as the Fairbairn-Sykes commando knife. Its long, narrow point offers good penetration but is liable to breakage if abused. Although often referred to as a knife, this design may also be referred to as a stiletto or (slender variety of) dagger due to its use as a stabbing weapon albeit one very capable of slashing as well.
(7) A spey-blade (once used for speying animals[citation needed]) has a single, mostly straight edge that curves strongly upwards at the end to meet a short, dull, straight clip from the dull back. With the curved end of the blade being closer to perpendicular to the blade's axis than other knives and lacking a point, making penetration unlikely, spay points can be suitable for skinning.
(8) A Kamasu Kissaki, often referred to as a "Americanized tanto" but is actually a Japanese design tip went out of use in the 15th century, it has a somewhat chisel-like point that is thick towards the point (being close to the spine) and is thus quite strong. It is superficially similar to the points on most Japanese long and short swords (katana and wakizashi). The traditional Japanese tantō knife uses the blade geometry of (1). The Kamasu Kissaki is often straight but may also be gently curved. The point is actually a second edge on the end of the blade, with a total edge angle of 60 – 80 degrees. Some varieties may have the back edge angled to the point slightly and sharpened for a short distance from the point.
(9) A sheepsfoot knife has a straight edge and a straight dull back that curves towards the edge at the end. It gives the most control, because the dull back edge is made to be held by fingers. Sheepsfoot look like a sheep's hoof. They were used mostly by sailors in old times, as the shape of the tip prevented accidental penetration of the work or a person when the ship rolled suddenly.
(10) A Wharncliffe blade is similar in profile to a sheep's foot but the curve of the back edge starts closer to the handle and is more gradual. Its blade is much thicker than a knife of comparable size. [1]
(11 and 12) An ulu (Inuit woman's knife) knife is a sharpened segment of a circle. This blade type has no point, and has a handle in the middle. It is good for scraping, and sometimes chopping. It is the strongest knife shape. The semi-circular version appears elsewhere in the world and is called a head knife. It is used in leatherworking both to scrape down leather (reducing thickness), and to make precise, rolling cuts for shapes other than straight lines.
Not pictured is the undulating style found on items like the kris or flame-bladed sword. These blades have a distinct wavy design and are sharpened on both sides, typically tapering to (or close to) a symmetrical point.

Hope this helps. Grendelking (too lazy to sign in...)
Grendelking

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Re:Clip vs Drop point blade style explanation. - Sunday, July 12, 2009 9:23 PM ( #5 )
Sorry for the double post but, I found this interesting as well. Looks very familiar to a certain knife I purchased a few weeks ago from Cold Steel.
Dr. Walter G. Stuck, 1426 Nix Professional Building, San
Antonio, has sent in the interesting Bowie Knife illustration
appearing below. This is a reprint from The Illustrated London
News of February 17, 1844. Readers should not fail to notice
the notches in the knife of the blade shown.

 
"The rifle is the first weapon you learn how to use,
because it lets you keep your distance from the client.
The closer you get to being a pro,
the closer you can get to the client.
The knife, for example,
is the last thing you learn."
 The Professional

"I don't want to cut my tie off, I've done that on occasion." 
Lynn C. Thompson
Absolute Proof DVD 
Safe Maker Knife Demonstration 


xxo

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Re:Clip vs Drop point blade style explanation. - Friday, July 17, 2009 5:10 AM ( #6 )
examples of drop points are the Pendleton hunters and a good example of a clip point is the trailmaster bowie.
Little Nick

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Re:Clip vs Drop point blade style explanation. - Saturday, July 18, 2009 5:21 AM ( #7 )
- [This post was marked as helpful]
just to clarrify. a clip point does not have to be curved. the pocket bushman for example has a straight clip point.

so anything from straight to con-cave would be a clip point. anything over straight would be a drop point. uless it was symetrical, then it would be a spear point.
MattBlack

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Re:Clip vs Drop point blade style explanation. - Sunday, July 19, 2009 4:18 AM ( #8 )
That sums it up pretty nicely Nick
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xxo

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Re:Clip vs Drop point blade style explanation. - Sunday, July 19, 2009 4:09 PM ( #9 )
MattBlack


That sums it up pretty nicely Nick


Yes it does!  Good explanation Nick.
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Re:Clip vs Drop point blade style explanation. - Thursday, October 22, 2009 11:14 PM ( #10 )
Message flagged as SPAM!
Yep, good explanation thanks!
spam link deleted
<message edited by ausdigr on Friday, October 23, 2009 1:05 AM>

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